On-Demand Content | Virtual Event
ALL TIMES ARE IN EASTERN TIME

Speakers will be available for Q&A and further dialogue within their respective ‘Meet The Speaker’ Break Out Pods: A safe space to talk candidly through your challenges, new tools/tactics. Dedicated VIDEO Q&A time, not only with the speaker, but with your industry peers. This is not a live chat or faceless group. This is an opportunity to have an engaged conversation with your industry counterparts. The speaker may have questions for you!

  • Introduction: The biopsychosocial model
  • Behavioral health and mainstream healthcare delivery
  • Discovering Behavior Analysis
  • Behavior Analysis Beyond Autism
  • Team-based Care
  • Behavior Analysis as a “New” Basic Science for Medicine
Steven Merahn, MD, FAAP
Chief Executive
UNION IN ACTION, INC
Behavior analysis is a natural science whose subject matter is behavior interacting with environmental events over time. Because behavior occurs at the level of the individual, behavior analytic research methods involve frequent, repeated direct observation and measurement of individual behavior under baseline (control) and treatment (experimental) conditions. Replications of those conditions are arranged in various ways to create single-case research designs (SCRDs) that enable strong inferences about relations between independent and dependent variables. That is, studies using SCRDs are controlled clinical trials (CCTs), not mere “case studies” or “case series.” In applied behavior analytic research and clinical practice, the focus is on clinically important improvements in individual behavior over baseline rather than statistical comparisons of group average scores as in typical between-groups studies; however, data from multiple behavior analytic CCTs can be aggregated and analyzed statistically. Because such studies yield rich data on individual responses to treatment, SCRDs are used by researchers and clinicians in several disciplines. For instance, some leaders in evidence-based medicine tout a variation of what they call “n-of-1 trials” as producing very strong evidence of treatment effectiveness, and the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine places such studies in the highest level of its evidence hierarchy. This presentation will describe how behavior analytic research methods can be and have been used to analyze and remediate some common behavioral health concerns in children.

Gina Green, PhD, BCBA-D
Chief Executive Officer
ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL BEHAVIOR ANALYSTS (APBA)
Katharine Zuckerman, MD MPH
Associate Professor, Pediatrics
OREGON HEALTH AND SCIENCE UNIVERSITY
Allow for the movement into smaller groups of your industry peers based upon the respective topics, and aligning your shared interests/expertise. A safe space to talk candidly through challenges/trends/solutions. Dedicated VIDEO Q&A time, not only with the speaker, but also with your industry peers. This is not a live chat or faceless group. This is an opportunity to have an engaged conversation with your industry counterparts. The speaker may have questions for you!

Meet The Speaker Roundtable For The 10:00 Session

Steven Merahn, MD, FAAP
Chief Executive
UNION IN ACTION, INC
Meet The Speaker Roundtable For The 11:00 Session

Gina Green, PhD, BCBA-D
Chief Executive Officer
ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL BEHAVIOR ANALYSTS (APBA)
Meet The Speaker Roundtable For The 12:00 Session

Katharine Zuckerman, MD MPH
Associate Professor, Pediatrics
OREGON HEALTH AND SCIENCE UNIVERSITY
This presentation will review existing evidence for the use of ABA to support the care and treatment of people with genetic syndromes. We will discuss specific presenting symptoms that can be ameliorated with ABA, and suggest pivotal junctures for including behaviour analysts on the treatment team. The presentation will highlight the relevance of considering phenotype and related behaviour in the selection of target behaviours for treatment, and influence of genetic syndromes on the design and implementation of behavioural assessments and behaviour support plans. The importance of inter professional collaboration with these cases will be underscored. Finally, we will discuss a framework for incorporating syndrome specific information into case formulation for those practicing behaviour analysis or working with behaviour analysts to support people with genetic syndromes.

Dr. Rosemary A. Condillac, C.Psych., BCBA-D
Associate Professor, BACB Liaison and ABAI VCS Coordinator, ADS Chair and Graduate Program Director
BROCK UNIVERSITY
Henry S. Roane, Ph.D., BCBA-D
Chief, Division of Development, Behavior and Genetics
SUNY UPSTATE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY
The most important advancement in the treatment of destructive behavior has been the development of functional analysis (FA), which is used to prescribe effective treatments, such as functional communication training (FCT). With FCT, the consequence that historically reinforced destructive behavior is delivered contingent on an appropriate communication response and problem behavior is correlated with extinction. Although this approach can be highly effective, many pitfalls and practical challenges arise when this treatment is implemented by caregivers in natural community settings. In this presentation, Prof. Fisher will present data and describe a line of research routed in stimulus control theory and behavioral momentum theory aimed at increasing the effectiveness, efficiency, and practicality of FCT for individuals with ASD who display destructive behavior in typical community settings. Specifically, Prof. Fisher will focus on: (a) recent research on establishing-operation manipulations that can be used to prevent extinction bursts when treatment is initiated; (b) stimulus-control procedures that can be used to promote the rapid transfer of treatment effects to novel therapists, contexts, and caregivers without reemergence of destructive behavior; and (c) stimulus- and consequence-control procedures that can be used as “behavioral inoculation” to prevent resurgence of problem when caregivers do not implement treatment procedures with pristine procedural integrity.

Objectives
  • Describe at least three empirically supported treatments for autism and related disorders
  • Understand the basic principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis involved in identifying the function(s) of destructive behavior
  • Describe a common function-based treatment for reducing severe destructive behavior and replacing it with appropriate behavior
  • Identify an empirically supported approach to preventing or mitigating treatment relapse following successful treatment of severe destructive behavior.
Wayne Fisher, PhD, BCBA-D
Director, Rutgers University Center for Autism Research, Education, and Services (RU-CARES)
Henry Rutgers Endowed Professor of Pediatrics, RWJMS
RUTGERS UNIVERSITY
For human beings, from birth to death, regular and refreshing sleep is vital to health and happiness. Nevertheless, significant numbers of infants, children, adolescents and adults across the lifespan experience sleep difficulties and disruptions. Chronic settling difficulties and nightwaking is common in infancy, adolescents are frequently sleep deprived, and insomnia is a major issue for adults. Beginning with the work of Bootzin and his Stimulus Control Therapy for adult insomnia, behavior analysis has made important but under-appreciated contributions to understanding and treating sleep disturbances. I will present a behavioral analysis of sleep across the lifespan, incorporating stimulus control and contingency management as well as biological and psycho-social factors, describe interventions based on this behavioral analysis, and review the evidence for their effectiveness.

Neville M Blampied
Emeritus Professor School of Psychology Speech and Hearing
UNIVERSITY OF CANTERBURY
Meet The Speaker Roundtables allow for the movement into smaller groups of your industry peers based upon the respective topics, and aligning your shared interests/expertise. A safe space to talk candidly through challenges/trends/solutions. Dedicated VIDEO Q&A time, not only with the speaker, but also with your industry peers. This is not a live chat or faceless group. This is an opportunity to have an engaged conversation with your industry counterparts. The speaker may have questions for you!

Meet The Speaker Roundtable For The 1:45 Session

Dr. Rosemary A. Condillac, C.Psych., BCBA-D
Associate Professor, BACB Liaison and ABAI VCS Coordinator, ADS Chair and Graduate Program Director
BROCK UNIVERSITY
Meet The Speaker Roundtable For The 2:45 Session

Henry S. Roane, Ph.D., BCBA-D
Chief, Division of Development, Behavior and Genetics
SUNY UPSTATE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY
Meet The Speaker Roundtable For The 3:45 Session


Wayne Fisher, PhD, BCBA-D
Director, Rutgers University Center for Autism Research, Education, and Services (RU-CARES)
Henry Rutgers Endowed Professor of Pediatrics, RWJMS
RUTGERS UNIVERSITY
Meet The Speaker Roundtable For The 4:45 Session

Neville M Blampied
Emeritus Professor School of Psychology Speech and Hearing
UNIVERSITY OF CANTERBURY

ALL TIMES ARE IN EASTERN TIME

Children with Down syndrome present with many medical and learning needs. A behavior analytic approach informed by an understanding of the Down syndrome behavioral phenotype can effectively improve multiple areas of development including social-communication, cognition, motor, self-care and problem behavior. Considering behavioral phenotype helps us build on phenotypic strengths such as social interest or visual processing when designing intervention to address phenotypic weaknesses such as expressive language or short term memory. Understanding behavioral phenotype informs choice of target skills to teach as well as likely reinforcers, functions of challenging behavior, and effective prompts. Putting all that together yields a model of the factors that impact impairments and corresponding intervention strategies. To illustrate I will describe behavior analytic interventions for children with Down syndrome across developmental areas.

Dr Kathleen Feeley, PhD, BCBA
Professor, College of Education, Information, and Technology
LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY
Line graphs and visual analysis have served as the engine of evaluation and decision making for applied behavior analysis. The advantages of line graphs include providing treatment data visually and summarizing a person's performance across a given time interval. Line graphs also communicate the sequence of treatments, the time spent in treatment phases, and the magnitude of behavioral change. Yet visual analysis has a history of low interrater reliability and inconsistent judgments. Other criticisms include the lack of universal decision rule and the lack of any meaningful statistics. The solution to all of the previously listed problems may lie in a standard ratio graph. The following experiment examines the extent to which behavior analysts could accurately detect a trend and reliability make a decision based on three conditions: a linear graph with a trend, a linear graph with a quantified slope, and a ratio graph with a celeration value. The results and implications of the study suggest a healthy path forward for visual analysis and the analysis, evaluation, and communication of data via ratio graphs.

Rick Kubina, Ph.D., BCBA-D
Professor, Special Education
PENN STATE UNIVERSITY
Access to applied behavior analysis services is limited for many parents of children with autism (e.g., due to a lack of specialty service providers in many rural areas), and this is especially the case for children who display severe challenging behavior. One option for partially addressing this barrier is telehealth. In this presentation, I will briefly describe the evolution and outcomes of in-home behavior analytic services delivered via telehealth for severe challenging behavior displayed by young children with developmental disabilities. Specifically, I will describe how we developed and conducted a treatment model comprised of functional analysis plus functional communication training that was implemented entirely by parents with coaching from applied behavior analysts. I will first describe, with case examples, how the model was initially implemented in-vivo in parents’ homes and then was applied to a telehealth service delivery model. Next, I will summarize comparative outcomes of the in-vivo and telehealth models, followed by suggested next steps as a call to action to continue increasing the access to behavioral healthcare for children who display severe challenging behavior.

Kelly M. Schieltz, PhD, BCBA-D
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
Stead Family Department of Pediatrics
Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA STEAD FAMILY CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL
Allow for the movement into smaller groups of your industry peers based upon the respective topics, and aligning your shared interests/expertise. A safe space to talk candidly through challenges/trends/solutions. Dedicated VIDEO Q&A time, not only with the speaker, but also with your industry peers. This is not a live chat or faceless group. This is an opportunity to have an engaged conversation with your industry counterparts. The speaker may have questions for you!

Meet The Speaker Roundtable for 10:00 Session

Dr Kathleen Feeley, PhD, BCBA
Professor, College of Education, Information, and Technology
LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY
Meet The Speaker Roundtable for 11:00 Session

Rick Kubina, Ph.D., BCBA-D
Professor, Special Education
PENN STATE UNIVERSITY
Meet The Speaker Roundtable for 12:00 Session

Kelly M. Schieltz, PhD, BCBA-D
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
Stead Family Department of Pediatrics
Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA STEAD FAMILY CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL
Meet The Speaker Roundtable for 1:00 Session

Alan Poling, PhD
Professor of Psychology
UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN MICHIGAN

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